UHGBC Aperture

UHGBC Aperture

The examination of the Planter Aperture Panel provides an opportunity to introduce vegetation to a vertical surface while also considering various aperture sizes. In the application of a façade the aperture becomes the primary controlling factor for the geometry of the panel. Aperture configuration and size can be calibrated according to the amount of light infiltration desired or the aperture size might be coordinated in accordance with the adjacent program behind the panel. In either instance it is the capacity to find a varied and diversified spectrum of options that initiates control functions of the aperture.  An equal number of outputs for the planter box associated with the panel is keyed into the opening and conforms into the top face of the panel. The vegetation inserted into the planter would thus need to be coordinated to the capacity of the planter, access for maintenance and availability to a grey water source from either the building HVAC or storm run off in the case of a mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) application.

It is possible to consider a single plant source in relationship to the planter or as climber vine as an option. Each would present subtle variables to the planter but might more importantly begin to reconfigure the other peripheral geometry – especially in the instance of the climber vine.

The Planter Aperture Panel is a single sided mold that utilizes the CNC machine to directly mill the casting surface. Given how industry and design concentration has leveraged a more singular face approach to pre-cast, this method would seem to provide the easiest transition opportunity for these communities. The prospect of a CNC mill working with the gantry and long singular panel system commonly found in most precast plants would suggest the capacity for easy integration.  To optimize the capacity for casting longer panels within this context after configuring a singular or small group of Planter Aperture Panel, it is possible to re-apply the panel or panels within a range to a unique surface. This surface can thus be coordinated to the specific needs of an architectural design.  Once the panel(s) are applied to the unique surface it is possible to ‘gang’ panels together and create columns of panels for the purpose of economizing the cast.